Last edited by Mucage
Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Electoral College and the Constitution found in the catalog.

The Electoral College and the Constitution

The Case for Preserving Federalism

by Robert M. Hardaway

  • 219 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Praeger Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Constitution: government & the state,
  • Elections & referenda,
  • U.S. Elections And Voting,
  • Political Science,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • Politics/International Relations,
  • USA,
  • Government - National,
  • Political Process - Elections,
  • Political Science / Government / National,
  • Election,
  • Electoral college,
  • Presidents,
  • United States

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages200
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9531972M
    ISBN 100275945693
    ISBN 109780275945695


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The Electoral College and the Constitution by Robert M. Hardaway Download PDF EPUB FB2

Finally, Hardaway discusses and analyzes the proposed reforms to the Electoral College, including those before the Congress at present. Professor Hardaway's book makes a strong case for the preservation of the federalist principles incorporated into the constitutional framers' plan for election of the president of the United by: Some commentators treat the Electoral College as the equivalent of holy writ.

This book begins with the debates in the Constitutional Convention, showing the many different views that were expressed by the delegates and how the Electoral College evolved into the version embodied in the original Constitution/5(2).

(1) the Electoral College is just a part of the "solar system" of the entire Constitution, a carefully crafted balance between the three branches of government and state and federal governments.

If you try to change one thing, you have to take into account how it will affect the rest. (2) The Electoral College does indeed "bias" votes.5/5. Finally, Hardaway discusses and analyzes the proposed reforms to the Electoral College, including those before the Congress at present.

Professor Hardaway's book makes a strong case for the. The electors are directed by the Constitution to vote in their respective states, and Congress is authorized to count their votes. To win, a presidential candidate must have a majority in the electoral college.

Before adoption of the Twelfth Amendment (), in the event that no candidate had a. This The Electoral College and the Constitution book by Dr. George Grant is an excellent, intellectual and Constitutionally sound work. This is a timely subject in our nation today and to truly understand the importance of the Electoral College one should read this primer and get educated on the electoral process.

Well written and excellently laid out.4/4(6). ELECTORAL COLLEGE. The electoral college was one of the compromises by which the delegates were able to agree on the document finally produced. “This subject,” said James Wilson, referring to the issue of the manner in which the President was to be selected, “has greatly divided the House, and will also divide people out of doors.

The Electoral College is embodied in the Constitution in Article 2, Section 1, and in the 12th Amendment. The Framers were wary of giving the people the power to directly elect the President — some felt the citizenry too beholden to local interests, too easily duped by promises or shenanigans.

A quick read presenting a compelling case for the constitutional Electoral College. The author assumes his reader has some knowledge of the basic function of this institution before reading the book so it may be helpful to overview the system before diving in.

America’s founders wisely considered many different aspects of democratic election including the preservation of minority rights (i.e /5.

I think we need to talk about how the Electoral College stabilizes the electorate in a way that, if we were only doing the popular vote, it wouldn't. We'd always be talking about a couple thousand votes here, a couple thousand votes there, in a way that I don't think we do with the Electoral College.

The Troubling Reason the Electoral College Exists 12 out of a total of 91 electoral votes allocated by the Philadelphia Constitution, more. The idea of abolishing the Electoral College and instead electing the president by direct popular vote comes about every few years.

Abolishing the Electoral College requires an amendment to the US Constitution. There are two ways to do that: Congress can propose an amendment by a two-thirds vote of both chambers.

The Electoral College was never intended to be the “perfect” system for picking the president, says George Edwards III, emeritus political science professor at Texas A&M : Dave Roos. Professor Bennett's new book challenges the conventional wisdom that reform of the electoral college is nearly impossible because it can be accomplished only through constitutional amendment.

He takes his reader on a lucid and fascinating intellectual ride through Cited by: Written in straightforward language, Enlightened Democracy traces the history of the Electoral College from the Constitutional Convention to the present, and along the way it explains why the Framers took such pride in their now-controversial creation.

After reading this book the case is clear: The Electoral College doesn’t /5(44). The Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, which forms every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United Electoral College consists of electors, and an absolute majority of at least electoral votes is required to win the election.

According to Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the. On how the Electoral College works Here are the basics: The Electoral College in the Constitution is very simple. It just says each state gets a number. The Electoral College system is an indirect system of voting. Under the Electoral College, American citizens are voting for an elector, who would then vote for the President.

Those citizens are not directly voting for the President. The framers of the Constitution had a number of different reasons for doing this. Electoral college, the system by which the president and vice president of the United States are chosen.

It was devised by the framers of the United States Constitution to provide a method of election that was feasible, desirable, and consistent with a republican form of government. For the results of U.S. presidential elections, see the table. The Constitution currently provides that if no candidate wins a majority of the Electoral College, the president is chosen by the House of Representatives, with one vote per state.

This study examines how the Electoral College actually works, how it is supposed to work, and how it might be reformed. Robert Hardaway first looks at the Constitutional Convention, the Twelfth Amendment, and historical elections where the Electoral College has come into play, providing the historical background to the present-day College.5/5(1).

This minibibliography lists titles that explain the Electoral College and its constitutional role. Also listed are titles discussing the contested elections of, and Braille and audio titles can be downloaded from the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) website or.

He’s also written extensively about the origins and utility of the Electoral College, most recently in his new book, The Constitution Today. In the wake of last week’s election, I reached out to Author: Sean Illing.

Is the Electoral College anti-democratic. Some would say yes. After all, the presidential candidate with the most popular votes has nevertheless lost the election at least three times, including To some Americans, that’s a scandal. They believe the Electoral College is an intolerable flaw in the Constitution, a relic of a bygone era that ought to have been purged long ago.

The Case For Abolishing The Electoral College Jesse Wegman, author of 'Let the People Pick the President,' says the Electoral College's winner-take-all rule is not mandated by the Constitution. The Electoral College is a Constitutional process established by the founding fathers to elect the President and Vice President of the United States.

It was designed as a compromise. Some delegates at the Constitutional Convention wanted Congress to choose the President while others preferred a democratic popular vote.

The Electoral Author: Mitch Eiven. The Electoral College Was Not a Pro-Slavery Ploy There is a lot wrong with how we choose the president. But the framers did not put it into the Constitution to protect the South.

The problem is, this disproportion isn’t the fault of the Electoral College, it’s the fault of a constitutional perversion enacted in that we’ve blindly followed ever : Joe Patrice.

Introduction: the solar system of government power --The electoral college: how it really works --Origins: the constitution convention and the twelfth amendment --Evolution: refining the electoral process --Elections: electoral effects and applications --Reform: proposals and alternatives --Conclusion: the case for preserving federalism.

The Founders of America thought so. They were responsible for establishing the “Electoral College” as part of the Constitution. The plan to elect our President and Vice President was created in Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution of the United States, and refined by action of the 12th Article of Amendment, ratified in Participants.

Jesse Wegman is a member of The New York Times editorial board, and the author of the new book Let the People Pick the President: The Case for Abolishing the Electoral was previously a senior editor at The Daily Beast and Newsweek, a legal news editor at Reuters, and the managing editor of The New York Observer.; William Ewald is professor of law and philosophy at the.

The term Electoral College comes from the Constitution itself. False. Although it originally expected that a group of electors would actually elect the president and vice president, it became the practice for the electors to vote for the candidate who had the most popular votes.

Schumaker writes, “The Electoral College was adopted by the framers of our Constitution as a method of ensuring our presidents would be well-qualified statesmen.” Yet it elected a president with zero political experience in Bayh–Celler amendment.

The closest the United States has come to abolishing the Electoral College occurred during the 91st Congress (–). The presidential election of resulted in Richard Nixon receiving electoral votes (56% of electors), Hubert Humphrey (%), and George Wallace 46 (%) with % of the popular vote.

However, Nixon had received onlymore. The Constitution’s text requires that a group of electors, commonly called the Electoral College, chooses the next president. If a majority of electors fails to agree on a winner, Congress picks the winner in continent elections held within Congress under the terms of the 12th Amendment.

The Constitution and the Electoral College Yale Law School constitutional scholar Akhil Reed Amar reveals the profound consequences the Electoral College.

Yes, the EC is not only constitutional, but the Constitution requires its use. The story of how the founding fathers came to enshrine the process in the Constitution is not pretty. And they never considered the possibility that it could lead to th. But the Electoral College has been enshrined in the Constitution for more than years, so getting rid of it wouldn't be easy.

Here's what to know about how it could be done. This video gives a short overview of the electoral college and what roles it serves in U.S. Presidential elections. It also explains why a candidate can win the popular vote but not actually win the election, which is what happened in the Presidential election.

10. The Electoral College represents a compromise among the drafters of the US Constitution — some of whom wanted Congress to pick the president while others argued for direct election by the people.

Re “Fix the Electoral College, or Scrap It” (editorial, Aug. 31): The debate has started again as to whether the Constitution should be amended to change the presidential election process.The framers of the Constitution set up the Electoral College for a number of is on the books in 29 states plus the District of Columbia.

In the Baca v. Hickenlooper case, a. Of course, but the original overarching goal of the Constitution was to entrust states to appoint electors in whatever manner their legislatures saw fit. The states subsequently decided, rightly, on a more democratic approach, awarding electoral votes on the basis of the popular vote in their state.